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THE TEACHERS 
COLLEGE OF 
INDIANAPOLIS 



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THIRTV-THIRD YEAR 

1914-1915 



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THIRTY-THIRD YEAR 



OF THE 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 
OF INDIANAPOLIS 



ORGANIZED IN 1882 
INCORPORA TED 1914 



1914-1915 



ACCREDITED BY 

THE INDIANA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

IN CLASSES A, B AND C 



In the William N. Jackson Memorial Building 

Twenty-Third and Alabama Streets 

Indianapolis, Indiana 



The Teachers College of Indianapolis 

1914-1915 

Board of Trustees 

MRS. ELIZA A. BLAKER MRS. J. GEORGE MUELLER 

MRS. W. W. CRITCHLOW MRS. MEREDITH NICHOLSON 

MRS. JOHN B. ELAM MRS. C. F. SAYLES 

MRS. GEORGE W. HUFFORD MRS. H. S. TUCKER 

Officers 

President Seceetaey 

MRS, C. F. SAYLES MRS. W. W. CRITCHLOW 

Vice-President Treasures 

MRS. MEREDITH NICHOLSON MRS. GEORGE W. HUFFORD 

MRS. ELIZA A. BLAKER 
President of Teachers College 

Advisory Council 
MR. F. M. AYRES MR. ALBERT METZGER 

MR. JOHN N. CAREY REV. 0. D. ODELL 

REV. E. W. CLIPPINGER HON. SAMUEL RALSTON 

MR. CHARLES E. COFFIN MR. G. A. SCHNULL 

HON. CHAS. W. FAIRBANKS MR. WARREN H. SIMMONS 
HON. C. A. GREATHOUSE, MR. THOMAS SPANN 
State Supt. of Public Instruc- MR. THOMAS TAGGART 
tion MR. CLEMENS VONNEGUT 

MR. JOHN B. ELAM 
Legal Adviser. 

The Incorporators 

ELIZA A. BLAKER GERTRUDE A. MILLER 

MABEL K. CRITCHLOW EUGENIE K. NICHOLSON 

EMMA L. ELAM FRANCES T. SAYLES 

LOIS G. HUFFORD MATILDA L. SCHNULL 

EVALINE M. HOLLIDAY ROBENA S. TUCKER 

KATE LATHROP MAYER NANCY BAKER WOOLLEN 



Board of Trustees meet the first Wednesday of each month, with the 
exception of July, August, and September. 



Faculty 

ELIZA A. BLAKER, President, Philadelphia Normal School, Cen- 
tennial Kindergarten Training School; Philosophy of Education. 

LOIS G. HUFFORD, A. M., English Composition, Literature, and 
French. 

KM MA COLBERT, Teachers College, Columbia University; Princi- 
ples of Teaching and Method of Graded Schools. 

ELIZABETH DOWNHOUR, Earlham College, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity; Biology and Geography. 

HARRIET E. TURNER, M. D., Physiology and the Teaching of 
Sanitation and Preventive Medicine in the Public Schools. 

MARTHA B. CRILEY, Bucknell University; Froebel Philosophy and 
Bible Literature. 

ALICE BUCHANAN, Teachers College, Columbia University; 
Book-binding. 

HELEN WALLICK, Teachers College, Columbia University; Do- 
mestic Science. 

FLORA NUCKOLLS, Assistant in the Domestic Science Department. 

ANNA FERN, Domestic Art. 

RUTH PATTERSON, Kindergarten Method and the Manual Arts. 

ELIZABETH BREWSTER, Howard Seminary; History of Education. 

HAZEL LAPINSKA, The Art of Story Telling. 

JENNIE RAY ORMSBY, Emerson School of Expression, Boston; 
Reading and Expression. 

NANNIE C. LOVE, Public School Music. 

RENA TUCKER KOHLMANN, Art Students' League, New York 
City; Public School Drmoing. 

BELLE BOGARDUS, Public School Drawing. 

BERTHA A. BENNETT, Indiana University, Posse Normal School 
of Gymnastics, College of North American Gymnastic Union; 
Physical Education. 

FAYE N. BENNETT, Ph. D., University of Wisconsin, Dennison 
University; Educational Psychology. 

BERTHA R. ELLIS, A. B., Vassar College; Arithmetic. 

JULIA HARRISON MOORE, B. L., Smith College; History and 

JOSEPHINE McDOWELL, Arithmetic. 

DOROTHY THORNBURGH, B. A., Indiana University; English. 
CHARM TUCKER, Indiana State Normal School, 
VIRGINIA COLBERT, Marysville College, Tennessee, 
BERTHA SUMERLIN, 

Assistants in the Department of Methods. 
JUNE VAN ALLEN, Assistant in the Department of Manual Arts. 
GRACE ERSKINE DeVERE, 1 v . , , ,, +Jl . 

MARY E. SCHELL, } kindergarten Method. 

DORA KLEPFER, Dunning System of Music. 
MARY ECKMAN, Secretary to the President. 
EDITH FOUNTAIN, Dwight Seminary, Indiana Library School; 

Librarian. 
A dministrative Department : 

BLANCHE G. MATHEWS, Registrar; BERTHA C. WALLACE, 

AMELIA C. BAUER 

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Lecture Courses for Season 
1914-1915 

GEORGE H. TAPY, A. M., Head of Education Department, Wabash 
College; Psychology. 

STANLEY COULTER, Ph. D., Dean Department of Science, Purdue 
University; Biology. 

W. W. CRILEY, D. D., Ethics. 

JAMES H. TOMLIN, Superintendent Public Schools, Evansville, 
Indiana; Concrete Pedagogy. 

GEORGIA ALEXANDER, Supervisor in the Indianapolis Schools; 
Method in Reading and Number. 

CHARLES A. VALLANCE, M. S., Chemistry. 

ADELAIDE S. BAYLOR, A. M., School Organization. 

GERTRUDE TUTTLE, Teachers College, Columbia University; 
Domestic Science. 

CHARITY DYE, A. B., Chicago University; The Fundamentals of 
Moral Education. 

RUFUS BERNHARD von KLELNSMID, Ph. D., Associate Superin- 
tendent and Director Department of Clinical Research, Indiana 
Reformatory. 

E. H. LINDLEY, Ph. D., Professor of Psychology and Philosophy, 
Indiana University. 

ANNA TORRENCE, Graded School Methods. 



Calendar, 1914-1915 

September 8, Tuesday — First Faculty Meeting. 

September 9, Wednesday — Registration and assignment of work — 
all departments, including Domestic Science, Domestic Art, and Ag- 
riculture for Graded Schools 

September 10, Thursday — Instruction begins. 

September 14, Monday — Jackson Kindergarten and Graded School 
re-open. 

September 21, Monday — Kindergarten and Primary Practice 
Classes re-open. 

October 23, Friday — Domestic Training Practice Classes re-open. 

October 29, Thursday — Sunday School Workers' Classes re-open. 

November 25 — Thanksgiving recess. 

December 23 to January 4 — Christmas recess. 

January 20, Wednesday — New Semester — Students enter for mid- 
year classes. 

Terms in Class A and B work will be opened as follows: Septem- 
ber 9, October 5, November 4, January 6, February 17, March 17, 
March 30, April 7, April 21, May 5, May 12, May 19, May 26, 
June 8 and June 15. 

On the above dates for A and B classes, special classes will be 
formed for experienced teachers for six and twelve weeks' study. 

June 5, Saturday — Annual Kindergarten Play Fest. 

June 13, Sunday — Baccalaureate Sermon. 

June 16, Wednesday — Commencement. 

June 16, Wednesday — Alumnae Meeting and Luncheon. 

First, Second, Third and Fourth Year classes close on June 22d. 

President's Office Hours, 2:00 P. M. to 5:00 P. M. 
Saturday, 9:00 A. M. to 11 :00 A. M. 



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Expenses 

A limited number of partial scholarships may be obtained for 
fifty dollars per year. 

Tuition in the regular departments $ 85.00 

Domestic Science, per year * 100.00 

Domestic Art, not including materials 85.00 

Public School Music Course 150.00 

A limited number of salaried scholarships are granted in the third 
and fourth year courses. 

Tuition Class A $25.00 

Tuition Class B, twelve consecutive weeks 25.00 

Tuition Class B, six weeks 15.00 

Tuition six weeks' course for experienced teachers 15.00 

Tuition Domestic Science, twelve weeks 30.00 

Tuition Domestic Art, twelve weeks 30.00 

Tuition Public School Drawing, twelve weeks 30.00 

Tuition Public School Music, twelve weeks 50.00 

Tuition Playground Course, six weeks 15.00 

Tuition Review Course, six weeks 15.00 

Tuition Mothers' Classes, per term of 15 lessons 7.50 

Tuition Sunday School Workers' Class, 15 lessons, a club 

of 100 members, each 2.00 

Tuition Nursery Governesses' Classes, 36 weeks 50.00 

Graduation Fee 3.00 

Diploma Fee 5.00 

Tuition is payable semi-annually in advance. Should a student 
leave the College before the close of the term, tuition is not returned. 
An additional charge of 10% is made for tuition not paid in advance. 

The fees for the use of the library and for a locker are included in 
the tuition. 

Students in the regular departments are required to furnish their 
own text books and materials, the cost of which need not exceed 
thirty dollars for the entire two years' course. One-third of the bill 
for books and materials is due on registration. Students in special 
courses may rent the necessary text books. 

•Tuition includes supplies in Cooking and Chemical Laboratory. 



Conditions for Admission to 
Teachers College 

Applicants must give satisfactory evidence of good moral charac- 
ter. They must pass a physical examination and bring a certificate 
of health. This examination may be taken after the student reaches 
the College. 

For admission to this Normal School, applicants must present a 
diploma from a commissioned, or a certified High School. Those who 
are not High School graduates must present a certificate of equiva- 
lency from the Indiana State Board of Education. 

Students for Class B must present Class A Certificates. 

Observation and Practice 

Primary classes are conducted in connection with several of the 
Kindergartens. In these the teachers in training may practice under 
supervision of experienced critic teachers, who are members of the 
Faculty. They have ample opportunity for observation in the Publie 
Schools of Indianapolis, in the Free and Private Kindergartens, and 
in the Model School connected with the Teachers College. During 
the summer term, the graded school of the Indianapolis Orphan 
Asylum is used for observation. The Vacation Kindergartens and 
Public Playgrounds offer additional opportunities for the study of 
child-life. 

Conditions for Graduation 

The regular curriculum consists of a three years' course for grade 
teachers. In addition to this, opportunity is offered to students de- 
siring supplementary work along any of the prescribed lines. A 
diploma will be granted to students completing the twc years' course 
in the Kindergarten department. 

In the Kindergarten department, there are two, three and four 
year courses. The fourth year's course leads to a degree in the 
Science of Education. This course consists of advanced work in 
Pedagogics, Experimental Psychology, Literature, French, etc. This 
course is for those who wish to do Normal Training. 



Curricula 

FOR GRADED AND RURAL SCHOOL TEACHERS. 

The curriculum of this College embraces all subjects prescribed 
by the Indiana State Board of Education for schools accredited to 
prepare for teaching, in Classes A, B and C. It includes the study 
of Psychology, History of Education, Method of Teaching, Biology, 
the Industrial Arts, Vocal Music, Oral Reading, Physiology and 
Hygiene, Stories and Games, Geography, History, Arithmetic, Liter- 
ature, Grammar and Composition, and Physical Culture. 

EXPERIENCED TEACHERS' COURSE. 

During the Spring and Summer terms, special courses will be ar- 
ranged for teachers of experience who may desire to increase their 
efficiency by a study of Method of Teaching, of Manual Work, of the 
Art of Story Telling, of Songs and Games, etc. 

An opportunity is given for reviews in all academic subjects. 

FOR KINDERGARTNERS. 

a. Psychology. 

b. History of Education. 

c. Froebel's Philosophy of Education. 

1. An interpretation of the Mother- Play. 

2. Gifts as arranged by Froebel to develop ideas of form. 

3. Occupations, so planned as to relate the child's activities 
to those of the larger world. 

d. Stories. 

e. Nature Study. 

f. Songs, Games and Rhythmic movements. 

g. Manual Work. 

h. Primary Method. 

This course is intended to show the connection of the Kinder- 
garten to the Primary School; also to give practice in the 
teaching of reading, number, and penmanship to children of 
the Primary grades. This College emphasizes the necessity of 
an understanding of Primary work on the part of the Kinder- 
gartner. The graduates of this department are consequently 
prepared to do efficient work in the Primary School, as well as 
in the Kindergarten. 

i. Literature. 

j. Practice. 

Students who have had previous training, and who wish to sup- 
plement such work, may enter this course at any time in the school 
year. 



DOMESTIC SCIENCE. 
Coukse. 
Two years' Diploma Course. 
Short terms of six and twelve weeks. 
Course of Study Includes: 

I. Lectures on foods and dietetic principles. 
II. Cooking in well equipped laboratory. 

III. Chemistry. 

a. General Chemistry — introductory to Household Chemistry. 

b. Household Chemistry — application to foods and the 

household. 

IV. Housewifery. 

a. Planning and serving of meals. 

b. Care and sanitation of the house. 
V. Practice. 

Observation and practice in conducting classes in cooking, 
and household management. 
VI. Method and Psychology. 

DOMESTIC ART. 

This course includes practice in hand and machine sewing; appli- 
cation of stitches to under-garments and simple dresses; study and 
use of commercial patterns; knitting, crocheting, darning and simple 
embroidery; discussion of materials as to costs, widths, suitability, 
and comparative wearing quality. 

SEWING AND TEXTILES. 

1. Discussion of textile materials; how made; sources of fibres; 
spinning; weaving; dyeing; finishing. 

2. Cotton; the plant; its products; description of common cotton 
materials; their manufacture. 

3. Linen; the flax plant; preparation of fibre; sources of linens; 
adulteration of linens. 

4. Wool; source; construction of fibre; classification; manufac- 
turing process; adulterations; identification and discussion of wool 
materials. 

5. Silks; source; history of industry; manufacturing; adultera- 
tions; artificial silk; silk products. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOL DRAWING, 
Fob the Regular and Special Courses. 

Drawing, when properly presented, becomes one of the most im- 
portant factors in the education of the child. It brings the home to 
the school ; makes the workman a philosopher, and opens the eyes 
of the child to the beauties of nature's secrets. 



The teacher needs (1) a knowledge of composition for selection 
and arrangement; (2) a knowledge of the principles, for tone bal- 
ance and relation; (3) a knowledge of form for object, animal and 
life sketching; (4) a knowledge of design with which to add beauty 
to the busy work for the child; (5) a knowledge of simple per- 
spective, by which the child learns how he sees trees or the road in 
his walks; (6) a knowledge of landscape, for the mysteries of night 
and morning, sunset and noon; (7) a knowledge of story- telling for 
the creative imagination of the child; (8) a thorough knowledge of 
material possible to be used in the school-room. 

This course gives an acquaintance with the material used for draw- 
ing: acquaintance with the material used for the Applied Arts. 

Landscape work. 

The daily observation of, and the making of, landscapes for irregu- 
lar masses in light and dark, and in color. 

The study of trees for name, form, and public usefulness. 

Free brush work of leaves and flowers. 

Pictorial drawing of animals, birds, and other animate forms. 

Figure drawing for action. 

Color notes from Nature, textiles, prints for harmony of color. 

Type forms in their relation to object drawings, toys, etc. 

Simple construction and free-hand perspective. 

The study of design for lettering, stenciling, handwork, and other 
ornamental purposes. 

Talks upon Architecture and Applied Arts. 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS. 

This course includes problems in clay modeling; free-cutting; 

cardboard construction; weaving in paper, wool and raffia: basketry; 
book-binding; elementary iron and wood- work. 



AGRICULTURE FOR THE GRADES. 

Special study is made of soil; its origin; fertility; kinds of soil, 
and plants best suited to each; preparation of soil for plants; soil 
water and its value to plants; drainage; percolation; capillarity; 
tillage. Test by experiments. 

Germination; test to show value of physical condition of the soil; 
plant food in soil; water in soil; air; sunlight. 

Study of grains grown in Indiana. Visits are made to the City 
Market to study vegetables and fruits. 

School gardens and home gardens. Preparation; care; enemies — 
M weeds and insects. 

Birds as public property. How to protect them; their economic 
value to the farmer. 

All experiments are those tried with reference to teacher and pupil. 



Gymnasium 

In the third floor of the building is a large, well-equipped gym- 
nasium, with dressing-room, shower-baths, etc. Exercises in phys- 
ical training are a regular feature of the course. 

Physical Education — 

1. Exercises in a well -equipped gymnasium, including free stand- 
ing movements; fancy steps; use of Swedish apparatus; games of 
strength and skill. 

2. In this course, the body and mind are co-ordinated; the body 
is considered or trained as the expressive agent of being; exercises 
are given for developing health, poise, dignity of bearing, good pres- 
ence, ease of manner, grace, symmetry, etc. A complete line of 
rhythmic work, including Aesthetic and Folk dancing, is used for 
developing finer subtlety in the body. Attention is given to indi- 
vidual defects with special adaptation to individual needs. 

3. Lectures and practice in the adaptation of physical education 
in the Public Schools, playground games and methods. 

4. Hygiene and Physiology are studied in this course. 

Notes 

Pupils will be required to dress for gymnasium without corsets or 
restriction to free movement of the neck, chest, arms, waist and feet. 
Measurements for dress waist should be taken loosely while the lungs 
are fully inflated. The weight of all clothing should depend upon 
the shoulders. Shoes should have low heels, with broad ball and toe 
measurements. 

Bloomers of material like the school dress may be buttoned with 
the outer skirt to the dress waist (made suitable for street wear and 
loose enough for gymnastics), and the outer skirt removed for gym- 
nastics. 

Special Classes 

Fob Women and Childben 
In Physical Education, Folk and Aesthetic dancing. 



Public School Music 

Nannie C. Love, Director. 

5 

"There is music in the child, and the inspiration of a song giveth 
understanding." 

This department offers a full two years' course in the theory and 
practice of music, on the completion of which a diploma will be 
granted. This course prepares the recipient to teach music or to 
supervise the teaching of music in any grade, and including the High 
School. 

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Those to whom diplomas are granted will have acquired a full un- 
derstanding of harmony and composition; ability to sing and to ac- 
company rightly; ability to direct with authority; familiarity with 
the leading works on Psychology and Pedagogy. 

The "Child Voice," the Note Song, Sight Reading, Music Writing, 
Classification of Voices and all points relating to technical skill will 
receive careful and intelligent attention. 

Partial courses, ranging from a twelve weeks' term onward, may 
be taken. The work is carefully graded and is adapted to the needs 
of children in each stage of development. 



Playground Work 

This course comprises manual work, stories, games, and whatever 
will contribute to efficiency in the conduct of playgrounds for 
children. 

A systematic course in plays for children is given to the students 
of Teachers College, such as is given to professional directors of 
playgrounds. This course is under the direct supervision of Dr. 
Harriet E. Turner, who is a graduate of the Posse Normal School of 
Gymnastics, Boston; a member of the American Physical Education 
Association, and also of the American Medical Association. Dr. 
Turner's experience has been wide as a teacher of gymnastics, as well 
as a worker in organized charities. 

There will be courses in Child Nature, Nature and Function of 
Play, Social Conditions of the Neighborhood, Hygiene and First Aid, 
Playground Movement, the Practical Conduct of Playgrounds, the 
Organization and Administration of Playgrounds. 



Additional Courses 

I. FOR SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHERS. 

The Teachers College now offers a two-years' course of study for 
teachers of younger children in Sunday Schools. The President of 
the College gives lectures, accompanied by illustration and practical 
example, in the skillful presentation of Bible stories and other stories 
of ethical value; on the choice of suitable pictures and wise explana- 
tion of the same; on child psychology and such kindred subjects as 
tend to the bettering of Sunday School teaching. 

II. FOR MOTHERS AND OTHERS WHO HAVE THE CARE OF CHILDREN. 

For the aid and guidance of mothers, and any who may have chil- 
dren under their care a special course has been planned. This will 
include a study of child nature; of Froebel's principles of education; 
especially his Mother-Play Songs; and practical work with such of 
his Gifts and Occupations as can best be utilized in the child's daily 
home life. 

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III. NURSES' DEPARTMENT. 

A Nurses' Class will be organized for giving training to 
mothers' assistants in the care of their children. The lessons include 
instructions on the right kind of plays for the nursery, on occupa- 
tions, stories, and songs suitable for the little ones. 

Details of Departments 

ENGLISH. 

The first two courses named are required. At least four other 
courses must be selected by candidates for a diploma from "Class C." 
I. ENGLISH USAGE — A study of the principles governing cor- 
rect use of English in sentences and paragraphs, together 
with regular practice in composition writing. 
II. A STUDY OF POETIC ART— The purpose of this course is to 
develop an intelligent appreciation of literature. It will 
include study of poetic diction, metrical forms, aesthetic 
qualities, structural forms, etc. It will be copiously illus- 
trated by selections from English and American authors. 
III. ENGLISH PROSE MASTERPIECES— The material for this 
course will be selected from the writings of Bacon, Milton, 
Bunyan, Addison, Lamb, Macaulay, Carlyle, Emerson, 
Ruskin, Arnold, Lowell, and others. 
IV-V. SHAKESPEARE— The plays will be selected with the pur- 
pose of gaining an acquaintance with the wide range and 
peculiar characteristics of the art of Shakespeare. The 
courses will be introduced by lectures on the English 
Drama before Shakespeare. 
VI. ENGLISH POETRY from Dryden to Wordsworth, with a 
study of the nature of the Romantic Revival. 
VII. Studies in Spenser, Milton and Tennyson. 
VIII. Studies in Shelley, Keats and Browning. 
IX. Studies in American Literature. 

X. In the Third and Fourth Year Courses, there will be special 
studies in Homer, Dante, Goethe, and other world- classics. 
XL A course in Mythology. 

Note. — A view of English Literature in its historical development 
will be given in connection with the different courses. 

HISTORY. 

For the present the work in History will be confined to that of 
England and America. It will be given by lectures, topical reading, 
note-books, and papers on assigned topics. 

I. AMERICAN HISTORY, to 1783. 
II. The AMERICAN NATION, from 1783 to the present time. 

III. ENGLISH HISTORY, to 1603 A. D. 

IV. ENGLISH HISTORY, from 1603 A. D. to present time. 

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BOTANY. 

1. Elementary Botany, Morphology of plants; the life history of 
representatives of the main classes of plants; a careful study of the 
higher seed-plants, with experimental work in germination and re- 
lated subjects. Students are expected to collect, identify and pre- 
serve easily accessible forms. 

ZOOLOGY. 

The work in this subject will include studies in Elementary and 
Systematic Zoology, laboratory investigation, and observation of such 
types of animal life as are within reach. 

GEOGRAPHY. 

The work in this course embraces: 

1. A study of the more significant facts of Mathematical and 
Physical Geography, special emphasis being given to the earth as a 
heavenly body, its motions, changes of seasons, etc. 

2. An intensive study of weather and climate. 

3. Commercial Geography; the effects of physical conditions upon 
the commercial life of nations; methods of production of common 
articles of commerce; the leading trade routes, etc. 

4. Physiography; a study of the origin and development of land 
forms; the nature of soils; the structure of the earth's crust, etc. 

MATHEMATICS. 

The courses in mathematics will include the usual branches of that 
science which are required in high schools and colleges. 



Syllabus 

OF 

METHODS IN THE GRADED AND RURAL SCHOOL TEACHING. 

I. The course of study. 

a. An organization of material from the child's point 
of view. 

b. A study of materials from the standpoint of develop- 
ment in the history of the race. 

c. The relation between the two. 

d. The teacher an important factor in assisting the child 
to an organization of his experience 

IL Discussion of methods in teaching. 

a. Methods which have been used. 

b. Motives in teaching. 

c. Motor activity. Its relation to method. 

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III. Discussion of method in special subjects — Language, Reading, 

Penmanship, Number, History, Geography, Nature Study, 
Manual Modifying Work. 

1. Nature of the subject. 

2. Relation to other subjects — co-relation. 

3. Psychological value. 

4. Practical use. 

IV. Types of lessons. 

1. Development lesson. 

2. Drill Review. 

3. Telling lesson, etc. 
V. Writing of lesson plans. 

VI. Practice teaching. 

1. Observation. 

2. Study of children. 

3. Study of curriculum. 

4. Six-weeks' school-room practice. 

Library Facilities 

The library, which contains more than five thousand volumes, 
offers excellent facilities for reference in the various departments of 
study, and in general literature. Upon request, the librarian of the 
Public Library of Indianapolis lends to the school whatever addi- 
tional books are needed for special investigation in any department. 
A number of standard educational periodicals are taken regularly. 



Good teachers will find no difficulty in securing positions. The 
demand is yearly increasing. The College cannot obligate itself, 
however, to secure positions for graduates. 

The Jackson Kindergarten and 
Graded School 

The Jackson Kindergarten and Graded School are departments in 
the Teachers College. 

Tuition Kindergarten children, 3 to 6 years of age, per week $1.00 

An additional charge of 25 cents per week will be made 
for all children who must be called for. 

Tuition, connecting class, per week 1.00 

Tuition, first primary grade, per week 1.00 

Tuition, second and third grade, per week 1.00 

Tuition, fourth, fifth and sixth years, per week 1.00 

Tuition, seventh year 1.00 

Supervisor EMMA COLBERT 

Director of Kindergarten. .ELIZABETH BREWSTER 
Associate Principals of Graded School 

VIRGINIA COLBERT and CHARM TUCKER 

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Department of Instrumental Music 
for Children 

Doba Klepfeb, Director. 

A course in piano study for beginners is now an established feature 
of the work for children at the Teachers College of Indianapolis. 
This Department is in charge of Miss Dora M. Klepfer, who has had 
much successful experience in teaching children, both individually 
and in groups. 

Tne method used is the Dunning System of Improved Music Study 
for Beginners, which is the best exposition of the first principles of 
piano study adapted to the teaching of children. 

This system claims that, under its method, music study is a joy 
from the beginning; and this claim is substantiated by its results. 
It inspires, interests and creates wise, intelligent musicians, because 
it teaches a child to think in music, and to understand the most im- 
portant points before making an attempt to play upon any instru- 
ment 

The period of the first few lessons in music is a crisis in a child's 
life. The impressions made upon the mind between the ages of five 
and twelve years are the strongest because of the child's suscepti- 
bility to the slightest influence at that time. 

In the early study, pupils are grouped in small classes and taught 
by means of symbols. These classes will be formed from September 
1 to 15, 1914. An early application is necessary. 

BATES. 
Term of ten weeks, two lessons per week $25.00 



Endowment Fund. 

Library $11,778.00 

Grounds 9,000.00 

Building 40,000.00 

Equipment 10,000.00 

Alumnae Gift 1,477.77 

Total $72,255.77 



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